Hitler's American Model

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Author :
Publisher : Princeton University Press
ISBN 13 : 0691183066
Total Pages : 0 pages
Book Rating : 4.6/5 (118 download)

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Book Synopsis Hitler's American Model by : James Q. Whitman

Download or read book Hitler's American Model written by James Q. Whitman and published by Princeton University Press. This book was released on 2018-09-04 with total page 0 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: "Nazism triumphed in Germany during the high era of Jim Crow laws in the United States. Did the American regime of racial oppression in any way inspire the Nazis? The unsettling answer is yes. In Hitler's American Model, James Whitman presents a detailed investigation of the American impact on the notorious Nuremberg Laws, the centerpiece anti-Jewish legislation of the Nazi regime. Contrary to those who have insisted that there was no meaningful connection between American and German racial repression, Whitman demonstrates that the Nazis took a real, sustained, significant, and revealing interest in American race policies. As Whitman shows, the Nuremberg Laws were crafted in an atmosphere of considerable attention to the precedents American race laws had to offer. German praise for American practices, already found in Hitler's Mein Kampf, was continuous throughout the early 1930s, and the most radical Nazi lawyers were eager advocates of the use of American models. But while Jim Crow segregation was one aspect of American law that appealed to Nazi radicals, it was not the most consequential one. Rather, both American citizenship and anti-miscegenation laws proved directly relevant to the two principal Nuremberg Laws--the Citizenship Law and the Blood Law. Whitman looks at the ultimate, ugly irony that when Nazis rejected American practices, it was sometimes not because they found them too enlightened, but too harsh. Indelibly linking American race laws to the shaping of Nazi policies in Germany, Hitler's American Model upends understandings of America's influence on racist practices in the wider world." --

Hitler's American Model

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Author :
Publisher : Princeton University Press
ISBN 13 : 1400884632
Total Pages : 224 pages
Book Rating : 4.4/5 (88 download)

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Book Synopsis Hitler's American Model by : James Q. Whitman

Download or read book Hitler's American Model written by James Q. Whitman and published by Princeton University Press. This book was released on 2017-02-14 with total page 224 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: How American race law provided a blueprint for Nazi Germany Nazism triumphed in Germany during the high era of Jim Crow laws in the United States. Did the American regime of racial oppression in any way inspire the Nazis? The unsettling answer is yes. In Hitler's American Model, James Whitman presents a detailed investigation of the American impact on the notorious Nuremberg Laws, the centerpiece anti-Jewish legislation of the Nazi regime. Contrary to those who have insisted that there was no meaningful connection between American and German racial repression, Whitman demonstrates that the Nazis took a real, sustained, significant, and revealing interest in American race policies. As Whitman shows, the Nuremberg Laws were crafted in an atmosphere of considerable attention to the precedents American race laws had to offer. German praise for American practices, already found in Hitler's Mein Kampf, was continuous throughout the early 1930s, and the most radical Nazi lawyers were eager advocates of the use of American models. But while Jim Crow segregation was one aspect of American law that appealed to Nazi radicals, it was not the most consequential one. Rather, both American citizenship and antimiscegenation laws proved directly relevant to the two principal Nuremberg Laws—the Citizenship Law and the Blood Law. Whitman looks at the ultimate, ugly irony that when Nazis rejected American practices, it was sometimes not because they found them too enlightened, but too harsh. Indelibly linking American race laws to the shaping of Nazi policies in Germany, Hitler's American Model upends understandings of America's influence on racist practices in the wider world.

Hitler

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Publisher : Penguin UK
ISBN 13 : 0141928662
Total Pages : 704 pages
Book Rating : 4.1/5 (192 download)

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Book Synopsis Hitler by : Brendan Simms

Download or read book Hitler written by Brendan Simms and published by Penguin UK. This book was released on 2019-09-05 with total page 704 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: SHORTLISTED FOR THE MARK LYNTON HISTORY PRIZE 2020 A DAILY TELEGRAPH BOOK OF THE YEAR 2019 A revelatory new biography of Adolf Hitler from the acclaimed historian Brendan Simms Adolf Hitler is one of the most studied men in history, and yet the most important things we think we know about him are wrong. As Brendan Simms's major new biography shows, Hitler's main preoccupation was not, as widely believed, the threat of Bolshevism, but that of international capitalism and Anglo-America. These two fears drove both his anti-semitism and his determination to secure the 'living space' necessary to survive in a world dominated by the British Empire and the United States. Drawing on new sources, Brendan Simms traces the way in which Hitler's ideology emerged after the First World War. The United States and the British Empire were, in his view, models for Germany's own empire, similarly founded on appropriation of land, racism and violence. Hitler's aim was to create a similarly global future for Germany - a country seemingly doomed otherwise not just to irrelevance, but, through emigration and foreign influence, to extinction. His principal concern during the resulting cataclysm was not just what he saw as the clash between German and Jews, or German and Slav, but above all that between Germans and what he called the 'Anglo-Saxons'. In the end only dominance of the world would have been enough to achieve Hitler's objectives, and it ultimately required a coalition of virtually the entire world to defeat him. Brendan Simms's new book is the first to explain Hitler's beliefs fully, demonstrating how, as ever, it is ideas that are the ultimate source of the most murderous behaviour.

The American Steppes

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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
ISBN 13 : 1107103606
Total Pages : 473 pages
Book Rating : 4.1/5 (71 download)

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Book Synopsis The American Steppes by : David Moon

Download or read book The American Steppes written by David Moon and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2020-04-02 with total page 473 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Explores the transnational movements of people, plants, agricultural sciences, and techniques from Russia's steppes to North America's Great Plains.

American Exceptionalism and American Innocence

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Publisher : Simon and Schuster
ISBN 13 : 1510742379
Total Pages : 342 pages
Book Rating : 4.5/5 (74 download)

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Book Synopsis American Exceptionalism and American Innocence by : Roberto Sirvent

Download or read book American Exceptionalism and American Innocence written by Roberto Sirvent and published by Simon and Schuster. This book was released on 2019-04-02 with total page 342 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A survey of some of the “fake news” reported to the American people over the last few centuries. According to Robert Sirvent and Danny Haiphong, Americans have been exposed to fake news throughout our history—news that slavery is a thing of the past, that we don’t live on stolen land, that wars are fought to spread freedom and democracy, that a rising tide lifts all boats, that prisons keep us safe, and that the police serve and protect. Thus, the only “news” ever reported by various channels of U.S. empire is the news of American exceptionalism and American innocence. And, as this book will hopefully show, it’s all fake. Did the U.S. really “save the world” in World War II? Should black athletes stop protesting and show more gratitude for what America has done for them? Are wars fought to spread freedom and democracy? Or is this all fake news? American Exceptionalism and American Innocence examines the stories we’re told that lead us to think that the U.S. is a force for good in the world, regardless of slavery, the genocide of indigenous people, and the more than a century’s worth of imperialist war that the U.S. has wrought on the planet. Sirvent and Haiphong detail just what Captain America’s shield tells us about the pretensions of U.S. foreign policy, how Angelina Jolie and Bill Gates engage in humanitarian imperialism, and why the Broadway musical Hamilton is a monument to white supremacy. “Danny Haiphong and Roberto Sirvent are two of the most courageous and truthful intellectuals in the belly of the U.S. imperial beast! In this powerful text they lay bare the hidden realities and concealed miseries of poor and working peoples even as revolutionary fire remains strong! This book keeps alive so much of the best of the radical tradition in the neo-fascist age of Trump!” —Cornel West, Professor of the Practice of Public Philosophy at Harvard University “In a damning indictment of the collapse of the American Empire and its Democratic, Republican, and corporate media overseers, Roberto Sirvent and Danny Haiphong expose the ruling class propaganda machine as it worships at the altar of austerity, war, and white supremacy. This book argues that efforts to produce a kinder, gentler corporatist American state are misguided and demonstrates that a radical, even revolutionary alternative is our only hope.” —Chris Hedges, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, author of America: The Farewell Tour

Fascism Comes to America

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Author :
Publisher : University of Chicago Press
ISBN 13 : 0226822451
Total Pages : 254 pages
Book Rating : 4.2/5 (682 download)

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Book Synopsis Fascism Comes to America by : Bruce Kuklick

Download or read book Fascism Comes to America written by Bruce Kuklick and published by University of Chicago Press. This book was released on 2022-11-22 with total page 254 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A deeply relevant look at what fascism means to Americans. From the time Mussolini took power in Italy in 1922, Americans have been obsessed with and brooded over the meaning of fascism and how it might migrate to the United States. Fascism Comes to America examines how we have viewed fascism overseas and its implications for our own country. Bruce Kuklick explores the rhetoric of politicians, who have used the language of fascism to smear opponents, and he looks at the discussions of pundits, the analyses of academics, and the displays of fascism in popular culture, including fiction, radio, TV, theater, and film. Kuklick argues that fascism has little informational meaning in the United States, but instead, it is used to denigrate or insult. For example, every political position has been besmirched as fascist. As a result, the term does not describe a phenomenon so much as it denounces what one does not like. Finally, in displaying fascism for most Americans, entertainment—and most importantly film—has been crucial in conveying to citizens what fascism is about. Fascism Comes to America has been enhanced by many illustrations that exhibit how fascism was absorbed into the US public consciousness.

Americans and the Holocaust

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Publisher : Rutgers University Press
ISBN 13 : 1978821700
Total Pages : 430 pages
Book Rating : 4.9/5 (882 download)

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Book Synopsis Americans and the Holocaust by : Daniel Greene

Download or read book Americans and the Holocaust written by Daniel Greene and published by Rutgers University Press. This book was released on 2021-11-30 with total page 430 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: What did the American people and the US government know about the threats posed by Nazi Germany? What could have been done to stop the rise of Nazism in Germany and its assault on Europe’s Jews? Americans and the Holocaust explores these enduring questions by gathering together more than one hundred primary sources that reveal how Americans debated their responsibility to respond to Nazism. Drawing on groundbreaking research conducted for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Americans and the Holocaust exhibition, these carefully chosen sources help readers understand how Americans’ responses to Nazism were shaped by the challenging circumstances in the United States during the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s, including profound economic crisis, fear of communism, pervasive antisemitism and racism, and widespread isolationism. Collecting newspaper and magazine articles, popular culture materials, and government records, Americans and the Holocaust is a valuable resource for students and historians seeking to shed light on this dark era in world history. To explore further, visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's digital exhibit, available here: https://exhibitions.ushmm.org/americans-and-the-holocaust Published in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Race After Hitler

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Publisher : Princeton University Press
ISBN 13 : 0691133794
Total Pages : 280 pages
Book Rating : 4.6/5 (113 download)

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Book Synopsis Race After Hitler by : Heide Fehrenbach

Download or read book Race After Hitler written by Heide Fehrenbach and published by Princeton University Press. This book was released on 2007-07-22 with total page 280 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Heide Fehrenbach traces the complex history of German attitudes to race following 1945 by focusing on the experiences of and the debates surrounding the several thousand postwar children born to African American GIs and their German partners.

Neither Settler nor Native

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Publisher : Harvard University Press
ISBN 13 : 0674249976
Total Pages : 416 pages
Book Rating : 4.6/5 (424 download)

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Book Synopsis Neither Settler nor Native by : Mahmood Mamdani

Download or read book Neither Settler nor Native written by Mahmood Mamdani and published by Harvard University Press. This book was released on 2020-11-30 with total page 416 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Shortlisted for the British Academy Book Prize for Global Cultural Understanding Making the radical argument that the nation-state was born of colonialism, this book calls us to rethink political violence and reimagine political community beyond majorities and minorities. In this genealogy of political modernity, Mahmood Mamdani argues that the nation-state and the colonial state created each other. In case after case around the globe—from the New World to South Africa, Israel to Germany to Sudan—the colonial state and the nation-state have been mutually constructed through the politicization of a religious or ethnic majority at the expense of an equally manufactured minority. The model emerged in North America, where genocide and internment on reservations created both a permanent native underclass and the physical and ideological spaces in which new immigrant identities crystallized as a settler nation. In Europe, this template would be used by the Nazis to address the Jewish Question, and after the fall of the Third Reich, by the Allies to redraw the boundaries of Eastern Europe’s nation-states, cleansing them of their minorities. After Nuremberg the template was used to preserve the idea of the Jews as a separate nation. By establishing Israel through the minoritization of Palestinian Arabs, Zionist settlers followed the North American example. The result has been another cycle of violence. Neither Settler nor Native offers a vision for arresting this historical process. Mamdani rejects the “criminal” solution attempted at Nuremberg, which held individual perpetrators responsible without questioning Nazism as a political project and thus the violence of the nation-state itself. Instead, political violence demands political solutions: not criminal justice for perpetrators but a rethinking of the political community for all survivors—victims, perpetrators, bystanders, beneficiaries—based on common residence and the commitment to build a common future without the permanent political identities of settler and native. Mamdani points to the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa as an unfinished project, seeking a state without a nation.

White Freedom

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Publisher : Princeton University Press
ISBN 13 : 0691205361
Total Pages : 436 pages
Book Rating : 4.6/5 (12 download)

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Book Synopsis White Freedom by : Tyler Stovall

Download or read book White Freedom written by Tyler Stovall and published by Princeton University Press. This book was released on 2021-01-19 with total page 436 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The racist legacy behind the Western idea of freedom The era of the Enlightenment, which gave rise to our modern conceptions of freedom and democracy, was also the height of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. America, a nation founded on the principle of liberty, is also a nation built on African slavery, Native American genocide, and systematic racial discrimination. White Freedom traces the complex relationship between freedom and race from the eighteenth century to today, revealing how being free has meant being white. Tyler Stovall explores the intertwined histories of racism and freedom in France and the United States, the two leading nations that have claimed liberty as the heart of their national identities. He explores how French and American thinkers defined freedom in racial terms and conceived of liberty as an aspect and privilege of whiteness. He discusses how the Statue of Liberty—a gift from France to the United States and perhaps the most famous symbol of freedom on Earth—promised both freedom and whiteness to European immigrants. Taking readers from the Age of Revolution to today, Stovall challenges the notion that racism is somehow a paradox or contradiction within the democratic tradition, demonstrating how white identity is intrinsic to Western ideas about liberty. Throughout the history of modern Western liberal democracy, freedom has long been white freedom. A major work of scholarship that is certain to draw a wide readership and transform contemporary debates, White Freedom provides vital new perspectives on the inherent racism behind our most cherished beliefs about freedom, liberty, and human rights.

America for Americans

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Publisher : Hachette UK
ISBN 13 : 1541672593
Total Pages : 432 pages
Book Rating : 4.5/5 (167 download)

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Book Synopsis America for Americans by : Erika Lee

Download or read book America for Americans written by Erika Lee and published by Hachette UK. This book was released on 2019-11-26 with total page 432 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This definitive history of American xenophobia is "essential reading for anyone who wants to build a more inclusive society" (Ibram X. Kendi, New York Times-bestselling author of How to Be an Antiracist). The United States is known as a nation of immigrants. But it is also a nation of xenophobia. In America for Americans, Erika Lee shows that an irrational fear, hatred, and hostility toward immigrants has been a defining feature of our nation from the colonial era to the Trump era. Benjamin Franklin ridiculed Germans for their "strange and foreign ways." Americans' anxiety over Irish Catholics turned xenophobia into a national political movement. Chinese immigrants were excluded, Japanese incarcerated, and Mexicans deported. Today, Americans fear Muslims, Latinos, and the so-called browning of America. Forcing us to confront this history, Lee explains how xenophobia works, why it has endured, and how it threatens America. Now updated with an epilogue reflecting on how the coronavirus pandemic turbocharged xenophobia, America for Americans is an urgent spur to action for any concerned citizen.

Race and America's Long War

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Author :
Publisher : Univ of California Press
ISBN 13 : 0520968832
Total Pages : 296 pages
Book Rating : 4.5/5 (96 download)

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Book Synopsis Race and America's Long War by : Nikhil Pal Singh

Download or read book Race and America's Long War written by Nikhil Pal Singh and published by Univ of California Press. This book was released on 2017-11-07 with total page 296 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Donald Trump’s election to the U.S. presidency in 2016, which placed control of the government in the hands of the most racially homogenous, far-right political party in the Western world, produced shock and disbelief for liberals, progressives, and leftists globally. Yet most of the immediate analysis neglects longer-term accounting of how the United States arrived here. Race and America’s Long War examines the relationship between war, politics, police power, and the changing contours of race and racism in the contemporary United States. Nikhil Pal Singh argues that the United States’ pursuit of war since the September 11 terrorist attacks has reanimated a longer history of imperial statecraft that segregated and eliminated enemies both within and overseas. America’s territorial expansion and Indian removals, settler in-migration and nativist restriction, and African slavery and its afterlives were formative social and political processes that drove the rise of the United States as a capitalist world power long before the onset of globalization. Spanning the course of U.S. history, these crucial essays show how the return of racism and war as seemingly permanent features of American public and political life is at the heart of our present crisis and collective disorientation.

How to Win the War on Truth

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Author :
Publisher : Quirk Books
ISBN 13 : 1683693094
Total Pages : 355 pages
Book Rating : 4.6/5 (369 download)

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Book Synopsis How to Win the War on Truth by : Samuel C. Spitale

Download or read book How to Win the War on Truth written by Samuel C. Spitale and published by Quirk Books. This book was released on 2022-10-25 with total page 355 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Made to Stick by Chip Heath meets Thing Explainer by Randall Munroe in this illustrated guide to navigating today’s post-truth landscape, filled with real-world examples of disinformation campaigns. The average person receives 4,000 to 10,000 media messages a day. It’s no wonder we struggle to separate the news from the noise and fact from fiction--but in these unprecedented times, it’s essential to democracy that we do. For anyone struggling to figure out how to live--and vote--their values, How to Win the War on Truth is here to help. You’ll learn: • The history of propaganda, from Edward Bernays to Fox News • Why simple messages are so powerful • How social messaging creates unconscious biases • Who profits from propaganda • How propaganda is manufactured and delivered directly to you Filled with real-world examples of disinformation campaigns that impact every citizen and clever illustration, How to Win the War on Truth will help you see the world with clear eyes for the first time.

Frida in America

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Publisher : St. Martin's Press
ISBN 13 : 1250113393
Total Pages : 384 pages
Book Rating : 4.2/5 (11 download)

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Book Synopsis Frida in America by : Celia Stahr

Download or read book Frida in America written by Celia Stahr and published by St. Martin's Press. This book was released on 2020-03-03 with total page 384 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The riveting story of how three years spent in the United States transformed Frida Kahlo into the artist we know today "[An] insightful debut....Featuring meticulous research and elegant turns of phrase, Stahr’s engrossing account provides scholarly though accessible analysis for both feminists and art lovers." —Publisher's Weekly Mexican artist Frida Kahlo adored adventure. In November, 1930, she was thrilled to realize her dream of traveling to the United States to live in San Francisco, Detroit, and New York. Still, leaving her family and her country for the first time was monumental. Only twenty-three and newly married to the already world-famous forty-three-year-old Diego Rivera, she was at a crossroads in her life and this new place, one filled with magnificent beauty, horrific poverty, racial tension, anti-Semitism, ethnic diversity, bland Midwestern food, and a thriving music scene, pushed Frida in unexpected directions. Shifts in her style of painting began to appear, cracks in her marriage widened, and tragedy struck, twice while she was living in Detroit. Frida in America is the first in-depth biography of these formative years spent in Gringolandia, a place Frida couldn’t always understand. But it’s precisely her feelings of being a stranger in a strange land that fueled her creative passions and an even stronger sense of Mexican identity. With vivid detail, Frida in America recreates the pivotal journey that made Senora Rivera the world famous Frida Kahlo.

Continental Reckoning

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Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
ISBN 13 : 1496234456
Total Pages : 705 pages
Book Rating : 4.4/5 (623 download)

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Book Synopsis Continental Reckoning by : Elliott West

Download or read book Continental Reckoning written by Elliott West and published by U of Nebraska Press. This book was released on 2023-02 with total page 705 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In Continental Reckoning renowned historian Elliott West presents a sweeping narrative of the American West and its vital role in the transformation of the nation. In the 1840s, by which time the United States had expanded to the Pacific, what would become the West was home to numerous vibrant Native cultures and vague claims by other nations. Thirty years later it was organized into states and territories and bound into the nation and world by an infrastructure of rails, telegraph wires, and roads and by a racial and ethnic order, with its Indigenous peoples largely dispossessed and confined to reservations. Unprecedented exploration uncovered the West’s extraordinary resources, beginning with the discovery of gold in California within days of the United States acquiring the territory following the Mexican-American War. As those resources were developed, often by the most modern methods and through modern corporate enterprise, half of the contiguous United States was physically transformed. Continental Reckoning guides the reader through the rippling, multiplying changes wrought in the western half of the country, arguing that these changes should be given equal billing with the Civil War in this crucial transition of national life. As the West was acquired, integrated into the nation, and made over physically and culturally, the United States shifted onto a course of accelerated economic growth, a racial reordering and redefinition of citizenship, engagement with global revolutions of science and technology, and invigorated involvement with the larger world. The creation of the West and the emergence of modern America were intimately related. Neither can be understood without the other. With masterful prose and a critical eye, West presents a fresh approach to the dawn of the American West, one of the most pivotal periods of American history.

American Rule

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Author :
Publisher : Penguin
ISBN 13 : 1524745723
Total Pages : 322 pages
Book Rating : 4.5/5 (474 download)

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Book Synopsis American Rule by : Jared Yates Sexton

Download or read book American Rule written by Jared Yates Sexton and published by Penguin. This book was released on 2020-09-15 with total page 322 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: From writer and political analyst Jared Yates Sexton comes an eye-opening journey through American history that unearths and debunks the myths we've always told ourselves. Recent years have brought a reckoning in America. As rampant political corruption, stark inequality, and violent bigotry have come to the fore, many have faced two vital questions: How did we get here? And how do we move forward? An honest look at the past—and how it’s been covered up—is the only way to find the answers. Americans in power have abused and subjugated others since the nation’s very beginning, and myths of America’s unique goodness have both enabled that injustice and buried the truth for generations. In American Rule, Jared Yates Sexton blends deep research with stunning storytelling, digging into each era of growth and change that led us here—and laying bare the foundational myths at the heart of the American imagination. Stirring, unequivocal, and impossible to put down, American Rule tells the truth about what this nation has always been—and challenges us to forge a new path.

Socialism and Democracy in W.E.B. Du Bois’s Life, Thought, and Legacy

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Author :
Publisher : Routledge
ISBN 13 : 1000088200
Total Pages : 282 pages
Book Rating : 4.0/5 (8 download)

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Book Synopsis Socialism and Democracy in W.E.B. Du Bois’s Life, Thought, and Legacy by : Edward Carson

Download or read book Socialism and Democracy in W.E.B. Du Bois’s Life, Thought, and Legacy written by Edward Carson and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2020-09-11 with total page 282 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Commemorating the 150th anniversary of W. E. B. Du Bois’s birth, the chapters in this book reflect on the local, national, and international significance of his remarkable life and legacy in relation to his specific commitments to socialism and democracy. Written with contemporary conditions in mind, such as the current political period of economic inequality, the debilitating reality of exploitative economic conditions, an expansive and invasive surveillance state, the grotesque injustice of the prison industrial complex, the ongoing crisis of police violence and the militarization of law enforcement, and a White House unashamedly spewing white supremacist, nationalist rhetoric in word and deed, this book collectively ponders how Du Bois’s radicalism can shape and re-texture historical understanding and underscore a reflective urgency about the future. In this volume, scholars and activists undertake thoughtful and analytical explorations with regards to how Du Bois’ commitments to socialism and democracy can inform current methodology and praxis. This book was originally published as a special issue of the journal Socialism and Democracy.