To ’Joy My Freedom

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Publisher : Harvard University Press
ISBN 13 : 0674264630
Total Pages : 336 pages
Book Rating : 4.6/5 (426 download)

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Book Synopsis To ’Joy My Freedom by : Tera W. Hunter

Download or read book To ’Joy My Freedom written by Tera W. Hunter and published by Harvard University Press. This book was released on 1998-09-15 with total page 336 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: As the Civil War drew to a close, newly emancipated black women workers made their way to Atlanta--the economic hub of the newly emerging urban and industrial south--in order to build an independent and free life on the rubble of their enslaved past. In an original and dramatic work of scholarship, Tera Hunter traces their lives in the postbellum era and reveals the centrality of their labors to the African-American struggle for freedom and justice. Household laborers and washerwomen were constrained by their employers' domestic worlds but constructed their own world of work, play, negotiation, resistance, and community organization. Hunter follows African-American working women from their newfound optimism and hope at the end of the Civil War to their struggles as free domestic laborers in the homes of their former masters. We witness their drive as they build neighborhoods and networks and their energy as they enjoy leisure hours in dance halls and clubs. We learn of their militance and the way they resisted efforts to keep them economically depressed and medically victimized. Finally, we understand the despair and defeat provoked by Jim Crow laws and segregation and how they spurred large numbers of black laboring women to migrate north. Hunter weaves a rich and diverse tapestry of the culture and experience of black women workers in the post-Civil War south. Through anecdote and data, analysis and interpretation, she manages to penetrate African-American life and labor and to reveal the centrality of women at the inception--and at the heart--of the new south.

Schooling Jim Crow

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Publisher : University of Virginia Press
ISBN 13 : 0813936152
Total Pages : 320 pages
Book Rating : 4.8/5 (393 download)

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Book Synopsis Schooling Jim Crow by : Jay Winston Driskell Jr.

Download or read book Schooling Jim Crow written by Jay Winston Driskell Jr. and published by University of Virginia Press. This book was released on 2014-12-03 with total page 320 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In 1919 the NAACP organized a voting bloc powerful enough to compel the city of Atlanta to budget $1.5 million for the construction of schools for black students. This victory would have been remarkable in any era, but in the context of the Jim Crow South it was revolutionary. Schooling Jim Crow tells the story of this little-known campaign, which happened less than thirteen years after the Atlanta race riot of 1906 and just weeks before a wave of anti-black violence swept the nation in the summer after the end of World War I. Despite the constant threat of violence, Atlanta’s black voters were able to force the city to build five black grammar schools and Booker T. Washington High School, the city’s first publicly funded black high school. Schooling Jim Crow reveals how they did it and why it matters. In this pathbreaking book, Jay Driskell explores the changes in black political consciousness that made the NAACP’s grassroots campaign possible at a time when most black southerners could not vote, let alone demand schools. He reveals how black Atlantans transformed a reactionary politics of respectability into a militant force for change. Contributing to this militancy were understandings of class and gender transformed by decades of racially segregated urban development, the 1906 Atlanta race riot, Georgia’s disfranchisement campaign of 1908, and the upheavals of World War I. On this cultural foundation, black Atlantans built a new urban black politics that would become the model for the NAACP’s political strategy well into the twentieth century.

Encyclopedia of U.S. Labor and Working-class History

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Publisher : Taylor & Francis
ISBN 13 : 0415968267
Total Pages : 1734 pages
Book Rating : 4.4/5 (596 download)

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Book Synopsis Encyclopedia of U.S. Labor and Working-class History by : Eric Arnesen

Download or read book Encyclopedia of U.S. Labor and Working-class History written by Eric Arnesen and published by Taylor & Francis. This book was released on 2007 with total page 1734 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Publisher Description

The Cultural Turn in U. S. History

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Publisher : University of Chicago Press
ISBN 13 : 0226924823
Total Pages : 464 pages
Book Rating : 4.2/5 (692 download)

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Book Synopsis The Cultural Turn in U. S. History by : James W. Cook

Download or read book The Cultural Turn in U. S. History written by James W. Cook and published by University of Chicago Press. This book was released on 2012-06-12 with total page 464 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A definitive account of one of the most dominant trends in recent historical writing, The Cultural Turn in U.S. History takes stock of the field at the same time as it showcases exemplars of its practice. The first of this volume’s three distinct sections offers a comprehensive genealogy of American cultural history, tracing its multifaceted origins, defining debates, and intersections with adjacent fields. The second section comprises previously unpublished essays by a distinguished roster of contributors who illuminate the discipline’s rich potential by plumbing topics that range from nineteenth-century anxieties about greenback dollars to confidence games in 1920s Harlem, from Shirley Temple’s career to the story of a Chicano community in San Diego that created a public park under a local freeway. Featuring an equally wide ranging selection of pieces that meditate on the future of the field, the final section explores such subjects as the different strains of cultural history, its relationships with arenas from mass entertainment to public policy, and the ways it has been shaped by catastrophe. Taken together, these essays represent a watershed moment in the life of a discipline, harnessing its vitality to offer a glimpse of the shape it will take in years to come.

Hope and Danger in the New South City

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Publisher : University of Georgia Press
ISBN 13 : 9780820327723
Total Pages : 334 pages
Book Rating : 4.3/5 (772 download)

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Book Synopsis Hope and Danger in the New South City by : Georgina Hickey

Download or read book Hope and Danger in the New South City written by Georgina Hickey and published by University of Georgia Press. This book was released on 2005-07-01 with total page 334 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: For Atlanta, the early decades of the twentieth century brought chaotic economic and demographic growth. Women—black and white—emerged as a visible new component of the city's population. As maids and cooks, secretaries and factory workers, these women served the "better classes" in their homes and businesses. They were enthusiastic patrons of the city's new commercial amusements and the mothers of Atlanta's burgeoning working classes. In response to women's growing public presence, as Georgina Hickey reveals, Atlanta's boosters, politicians, and reformers created a set of images that attempted to define the lives and contributions of working women. Through these images, city residents expressed ambivalence toward Atlanta's growth, which, although welcome, also threatened the established racial and gender hierarchies of the city. Using period newspapers, municipal documents, government investigations, organizational records, oral histories, and photographic evidence, Hope and Danger in the New South City relates the experience of working-class women across lines of race—as sources of labor, community members, activists, pleasure seekers, and consumers of social services—to the process of urban development.

Work Won't Love You Back

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Publisher : Hachette UK
ISBN 13 : 1568589387
Total Pages : 432 pages
Book Rating : 4.5/5 (858 download)

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Book Synopsis Work Won't Love You Back by : Sarah Jaffe

Download or read book Work Won't Love You Back written by Sarah Jaffe and published by Hachette UK. This book was released on 2021-01-26 with total page 432 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A deeply-reported examination of why "doing what you love" is a recipe for exploitation, creating a new tyranny of work in which we cheerily acquiesce to doing jobs that take over our lives. You're told that if you "do what you love, you'll never work a day in your life." Whether it's working for "exposure" and "experience," or enduring poor treatment in the name of "being part of the family," all employees are pushed to make sacrifices for the privilege of being able to do what we love. In Work Won't Love You Back, Sarah Jaffe, a preeminent voice on labor, inequality, and social movements, examines this "labor of love" myth—the idea that certain work is not really work, and therefore should be done out of passion instead of pay. Told through the lives and experiences of workers in various industries—from the unpaid intern, to the overworked teacher, to the nonprofit worker and even the professional athlete—Jaffe reveals how all of us have been tricked into buying into a new tyranny of work. As Jaffe argues, understanding the trap of the labor of love will empower us to work less and demand what our work is worth. And once freed from those binds, we can finally figure out what actually gives us joy, pleasure, and satisfaction.

Unintended Consequences of Constitutional Amendment

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Publisher : University of Georgia Press
ISBN 13 : 9780820321882
Total Pages : 276 pages
Book Rating : 4.3/5 (188 download)

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Book Synopsis Unintended Consequences of Constitutional Amendment by : David E. Kyvig

Download or read book Unintended Consequences of Constitutional Amendment written by David E. Kyvig and published by University of Georgia Press. This book was released on 2000 with total page 276 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Constitutional amendments, like all laws, may lead to unanticipated and even undesired outcomes. In this collection of original essays, a team of distinguished historians, political scientists, and legal scholars led by award-winning constitutional historian David E. Kyvig examines significant instances in which reform produced something other than the foreseen result. An opening essay examines the intentions of the Constitution’s framers in creating an amending mechanism and then explores unexpected uses of that instrument. Thereafter, authors focus on the Bill of Rights and subsequent amendments, addressing such subjects as criminal justice procedures, the presidential election system, the Civil War’s impact on race and gender relations, the experiment in national prohibition, women’s suffrage, and, finally, limits on the presidency. Together these contributions illuminate aspects of constitutional stability and evolution, challenging current thinking about reform within the formal system of change provided by Article V of the Constitution. Forcefully demonstrating that constitutional law is not immune to unanticipated consequences, the eight scholars underscore the need for care, responsibility, and historical awareness in altering the nation’s fundamental law.

Forging Freedom

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Publisher : Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN 13 : 9780807869093
Total Pages : 288 pages
Book Rating : 4.8/5 (99 download)

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Book Synopsis Forging Freedom by : Amrita Chakrabarti Myers

Download or read book Forging Freedom written by Amrita Chakrabarti Myers and published by Univ of North Carolina Press. This book was released on 2011-11-14 with total page 288 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: For black women in antebellum Charleston, freedom was not a static legal category but a fragile and contingent experience. In this deeply researched social history, Amrita Chakrabarti Myers analyzes the ways in which black women in Charleston acquired, defined, and defended their own vision of freedom. Drawing on legislative and judicial materials, probate data, tax lists, church records, family papers, and more, Myers creates detailed portraits of individual women while exploring how black female Charlestonians sought to create a fuller freedom by improving their financial, social, and legal standing. Examining both those who were officially manumitted and those who lived as free persons but lacked official documentation, Myers reveals that free black women filed lawsuits and petitions, acquired property (including slaves), entered into contracts, paid taxes, earned wages, attended schools, and formed familial alliances with wealthy and powerful men, black and white--all in an effort to solidify and expand their freedom. Never fully free, black women had to depend on their skills of negotiation in a society dedicated to upholding both slavery and patriarchy. Forging Freedom examines the many ways in which Charleston's black women crafted a freedom of their own design instead of accepting the limited existence imagined for them by white Southerners.

Unequal Freedom

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Publisher : Harvard University Press
ISBN 13 : 0674263820
Total Pages : 320 pages
Book Rating : 4.6/5 (426 download)

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Book Synopsis Unequal Freedom by : Evelyn Nakano Glenn

Download or read book Unequal Freedom written by Evelyn Nakano Glenn and published by Harvard University Press. This book was released on 2004-04-15 with total page 320 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The inequalities that persist in America have deep historical roots. Evelyn Nakano Glenn untangles this complex history in a unique comparative regional study from the end of Reconstruction to the eve of World War II. During this era the country experienced enormous social and economic changes with the abolition of slavery, rapid territorial expansion, and massive immigration, and struggled over the meaning of free labor and the essence of citizenship as people who previously had been excluded sought the promise of economic freedom and full political rights. After a lucid overview of the concepts of the free worker and the independent citizen at the national level, Glenn vividly details how race and gender issues framed the struggle over labor and citizenship rights at the local level between blacks and whites in the South, Mexicans and Anglos in the Southwest, and Asians and haoles (the white planter class) in Hawaii. She illuminates the complex interplay of local and national forces in American society and provides a dynamic view of how labor and citizenship were defined, enforced, and contested in a formative era for white-nonwhite relations in America.

Black Bodies, White Gazes

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Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN 13 : 0742571726
Total Pages : 289 pages
Book Rating : 4.7/5 (257 download)

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Book Synopsis Black Bodies, White Gazes by : George Yancy

Download or read book Black Bodies, White Gazes written by George Yancy and published by Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. This book was released on 2008-09-26 with total page 289 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race understands Black embodiment within the context of white hegemony within the context of a racist, anti-Black world. Yancy demonstrates that the Black body is a historically lived text on which whites have inscribed their projections which speak equally forcefully to whites' own self-conceptualizations.

Colored Amazons

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Publisher : Duke University Press
ISBN 13 : 0822387700
Total Pages : 274 pages
Book Rating : 4.8/5 (238 download)

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Book Synopsis Colored Amazons by : Kali N. Gross

Download or read book Colored Amazons written by Kali N. Gross and published by Duke University Press. This book was released on 2006-06-21 with total page 274 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Colored Amazons is a groundbreaking historical analysis of the crimes, prosecution, and incarceration of black women in Philadelphia at the turn of the twentieth century. Kali N. Gross reconstructs black women’s crimes and their representations in popular press accounts and within the discourses of urban and penal reform. Most importantly, she considers what these crimes signified about the experiences, ambitions, and frustrations of the marginalized women who committed them. Gross argues that the perpetrators and the state jointly constructed black female crime. For some women, crime functioned as a means to attain personal and social autonomy. For the state, black female crime and its representations effectively galvanized and justified a host of urban reform initiatives that reaffirmed white, middle-class authority. Gross draws on prison records, trial transcripts, news accounts, and rare mug shot photographs. Providing an overview of Philadelphia’s black women criminals, she describes the women’s work, housing, and leisure activities and their social position in relation to the city’s native-born whites, European immigrants, and elite and middle-class African Americans. She relates how news accounts exaggerated black female crime, trading in sensationalistic portraits of threatening “colored Amazons,” and she considers criminologists’ interpretations of the women’s criminal acts, interpretations largely based on notions of hereditary criminality. Ultimately, Gross contends that the history of black female criminals is in many ways a history of the rift between the political rhetoric of democracy and the legal and social realities of those marginalized by its shortcomings.

He Is My Freedom

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Author :
Publisher : David C Cook
ISBN 13 : 9781434703262
Total Pages : 212 pages
Book Rating : 4.7/5 (326 download)

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Book Synopsis He Is My Freedom by :

Download or read book He Is My Freedom written by and published by David C Cook. This book was released on 2008 with total page 212 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: He Is My Freedom is a ten-week Bible study designed to help women experience God's grace in their daily lives.

Putting Their Hands on Race

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Publisher : Rutgers University Press
ISBN 13 : 1978800487
Total Pages : 373 pages
Book Rating : 4.9/5 (88 download)

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Book Synopsis Putting Their Hands on Race by : Danielle T. Phillips-Cunningham

Download or read book Putting Their Hands on Race written by Danielle T. Phillips-Cunningham and published by Rutgers University Press. This book was released on 2019-12-13 with total page 373 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Winner of the 2020 Sarah A. Whaley Book Prize from the National Women's Studies Association Putting Their Hands on Race offers an important labor history of 19th and early 20th century Irish immigrant and US southern Black migrant domestic workers. Drawing on a range of archival sources, this intersectional study explores how these women were significant to the racial labor and citizenship politics of their time. Their migrations to northeastern cities challenged racial hierarchies and formations. Southern Black migrant women resisted the gendered racism of domestic service, and Irish immigrant women strove to expand whiteness to position themselves as deserving of labor rights. On the racially fractious terrain of labor, Black women and Irish immigrant women, including Victoria Earle Matthews, the “Irish Rambler”, Leonora Barry, and Anna Julia Cooper, gathered data, wrote letters and speeches, marched, protested, engaged in private acts of resistance in the workplace, and created women’s institutions and organizations to assert domestic workers’ right to living wages and protection.

I Saw Death Coming

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Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN 13 : 1635576644
Total Pages : 339 pages
Book Rating : 4.6/5 (557 download)

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Book Synopsis I Saw Death Coming by : Kidada E. Williams

Download or read book I Saw Death Coming written by Kidada E. Williams and published by Bloomsbury Publishing USA. This book was released on 2023-01-17 with total page 339 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: From a groundbreaking scholar, a heart-wrenching reexamination of the struggle for survival in the Reconstruction-era South, and what it cost. The story of Reconstruction is often told from the perspective of the politicians, generals, and journalists whose accounts claim an outsized place in collective memory. But this pivotal era looked very different to African Americans in the South transitioning from bondage to freedom after 1865. They were besieged by a campaign of white supremacist violence that persisted through the 1880s and beyond. For too long, their lived experiences have been sidelined, impoverishing our understanding of the obstacles post-Civil War Black families faced, their inspiring determination to survive, and the physical and emotional scars they bore because of it. In I Saw Death Coming, Kidada E. Williams offers a breakthrough account of the much-debated Reconstruction period, transporting readers into the daily existence of formerly enslaved people building hope-filled new lives. Drawing on overlooked sources and bold new readings of the archives, Williams offers a revelatory and, in some cases, minute-by-minute record of nighttime raids and Ku Klux Klan strikes. And she deploys cutting-edge scholarship on trauma to consider how the effects of these attacks would linger for decades-indeed, generations-to come. For readers of Carol Anderson, Tiya Miles, and Clint Smith, I Saw Death Coming is an indelible and essential book that speaks to some of the most pressing questions of our times.

Raising Freedom's Child

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Publisher : NYU Press
ISBN 13 : 9780814795705
Total Pages : 336 pages
Book Rating : 4.7/5 (57 download)

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Book Synopsis Raising Freedom's Child by : Mary Niall Mitchell

Download or read book Raising Freedom's Child written by Mary Niall Mitchell and published by NYU Press. This book was released on 2008-04-01 with total page 336 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The end of slavery in the United States inspired conflicting visions of the future for all Americans in the nineteenth century, black and white, slave and free. The black child became a figure upon which people projected their hopes and fears about slavery’s abolition. As a member of the first generation of African Americans raised in freedom, the black child—freedom’s child—offered up the possibility that blacks might soon enjoy the same privileges as whites: landownership, equality, autonomy. Yet for most white southerners, this vision was unwelcome, even frightening. Many northerners, too, expressed doubts about the consequences of abolition for the nation and its identity as a white republic. From the 1850s and the Civil War to emancipation and the official end of Reconstruction in 1877, Raising Freedom’s Child examines slave emancipation and opposition to it as a far-reaching, national event with profound social, political, and cultural consequences. Mary Niall Mitchell analyzes multiple views of the black child—in letters, photographs, newspapers, novels, and court cases—to demonstrate how Americans contested and defended slavery and its abolition. With each chapter, Mitchell narrates an episode in the lives of freedom’s children, from debates over their education and labor to the future of racial classification and American citizenship.Raising Freedom’s Child illustrates how intensely the image of the black child captured the imaginations of many Americans during the upheavals of the Civil War era. Through public struggles over the black child, Mitchell argues, Americans by turns challenged and reinforced the racial inequality fostered under slavery in the United States. Only with the triumph of segregation in public schools in 1877 did the black child lose her central role in the national debate over civil rights, a role she would not play again until the 1950s.

Pageants, Parlors, & Pretty Women

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Publisher : UNC Press Books
ISBN 13 : 1469614200
Total Pages : 378 pages
Book Rating : 4.4/5 (961 download)

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Book Synopsis Pageants, Parlors, & Pretty Women by : Blain Roberts

Download or read book Pageants, Parlors, & Pretty Women written by Blain Roberts and published by UNC Press Books. This book was released on 2014 with total page 378 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Pageants, Parlors, and Pretty Women: Race and Beauty in the Twentieth-Century South

Intimate Justice

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
ISBN 13 : 0190251646
Total Pages : 240 pages
Book Rating : 4.1/5 (25 download)

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Book Synopsis Intimate Justice by : Shatema Threadcraft

Download or read book Intimate Justice written by Shatema Threadcraft and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2016-10-03 with total page 240 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In 1973, the year the women's movement won an important symbolic victory with Roe v. Wade, reports surfaced that twelve-year-old Minnie Lee Relf and her fourteen-year-old sister Mary Alice, the daughters of black Alabama farm hands, had been sterilized without their or their parents' knowledge or consent. Just as women's ability to control reproduction moved to the forefront of the feminist movement, the Relf sisters' plight stood as a reminder of the ways in which the movement's accomplishments had diverged sharply along racial lines. Thousands of forced sterilizations were performed on black women during this period, convincing activists in the Black Power, civil rights and women's movements that they needed to address, pointedly, the racial injustices surrounding equal access to reproductive labor and intimate life in America. As horrific as the Relf tragedy was, it fit easily within a set of critical events within black women's sexual and reproductive history in America, which black feminists argue began with coerced reproduction and enforced child neglect in the period of enslavement. While reproductive rights activists and organizations, historians and legal scholars have all begun to grapple with this history and its meaning, political theorists have yet to do so. Intimate Justice charts the long and still incomplete path to black female intimate freedom and equality--a path marked by infanticides, sexual terrorism, race riots, coerced sterilizations and racially biased child removal policies. In order to challenge prevailing understandings of freedom and equality, Shatema Threadcraft considers the troubled status of black female intimate life during four moments: antebellum slavery, Reconstruction, the nadir, and the civil rights and women's movement eras. Taking up important and often overlooked aspects of the necessary conditions for justice, Threadcraft's book is a compelling challenge to the meaning of equality in American race and gender relations.